History
 Info  admin  02-Jan-2015 16:20  0  12657 reads

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Seven Hills Neighborhood Houses is a one-stop social service agency offering a wide array of client-driven services to individuals, children, families, and seniors. Founded in 1961 with the merger of the West End's Findlay Street Neighborhood House and the East End's Riverview Neighbors House, Seven Hills has served individuals for 50 years.

 

Mission Statement:  As a partner in the communities we serve, we are dedicated to improving the quality of life of our neighbors.

 

The Vision: Seven Hills values communities that encourage self-determination and self-sufficiency. As a partner and catalyst for change, we provide opportunities through our services and programs that address the evolving needs of our neighbors and that strengthen families, children, seniors, and individuals

 

  • The Findlay Street Neighborhood House, a settlement house and neighborhood center has been located on the corner of Findlay and Baymiller Streets since 1945. Originally it was housed in the old Episcopal church building and provided services in the West End. The community is over 90% black and is one of the oldest established communities in Cincinnati.

  • The River Neighbors House was located in the East End across from the current location of the Montgomery Boat House. It was also a settlement house and provided services to a largely low-income white community in the East End.

  • The objective of the merger was to “realize anticipated advantages in economy of finances and staff skills.” They also hoped to increase service flexibility and eventually expand into other areas of the city. In fact, during 1962, services were expanded to include the Neighborhood House in Avondale.

  • Shortly after the merger, the East End facility moved to the old St. Stephens School building. In 2009, the agency moved into the new Riverview East Academy School Building.

  • In the late 60’s, Seven Hills conducted a successful capital campaign to raise $750,000 to replace the old church building. Our current facility on the corner of the Findlay and Baymiller Streets was the result of this campaign. In 1988, another successful capital campaign was conducted to raise $875,000 to add a counseling center, and remodel Findlay Street, and to renovate The Ruth Steiner Community Center on Ezzard Charles Drive to better accommodate seniors and child care programs. The remodeling of the Agency’s corporate offices on Ezzard Charles was also an objective of this campaign.

  • In December, 1992 the Agency’s lease on the Ezzard Charles facility was terminated. This caused the child care program to be moved into the Findlay Street building in the newly constructed space intended for a counseling center. Simultaneously, new quarters were also found for the Agency’s corporate offices on the corner of Freeman Avenue and Findlay Street.

  • In 1977, at the request of the Community Chest, Seven Hills expanded its geographic scope to include Lincoln Heights, Woodlawn and Lockland. Separately, in 1981 David T. Young, a life long resident of Boone County bequeathed 339 acres of prime farm and wood land in Boone County, Kentucky to Seven Hills. This land was to be used for camping, educational, and recreational activities. He intended that the land remain undeveloped and not be used or sold for any residential or industrial purpose. In 1991 over 100 acres of land were sold to the Parks Commission of Boone County for use as a recreation facility.

  • In 2008, Seven Hills moved the corporate office from Freeman Ave. into the Findlay Street Neighborhood House to decrease the agency's overhead costs. In 2010, the church attached to the corporate office was sold to a group of three young developers to create a musical theater.

  • In 2015 The Reds Community Fund, aimed at reaching out to the local community, has teamed up with volunteers from Procter & Gamble Co. and the Cincinnati Zoo to make a host of improvements to the 7 Hills Neighborhoods Houses center. Local 12 TV broadcast a great story about how All-Star Game in Cincinnati positively impacts West End neighborhood. 
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